Missionary Garnette Petersen-Doty

Home At Last!

Long-time FCA missionary to Liberia, Garnette Petersen Doty, 96, went to be with the Lord Monday, April 15, 2019 in Duluth, MN, surrounded by her loving family.

Garnette was a lifelong member of Duluth Gospel Tabernacle and active in its Sunday school and music programs. She married Sidney Petersen of Minden, NE, in 1949. They lived in Duluth until 1957 when they went as missionaries to Liberia, West Africa.

In addition to their missionary work, Sidney and Garnette served churches in Breckenridge, MN, and Palisades Park, NJ. After retirement, they were interim pastors at churches in Brooklyn and Staten Island, NY.

After Sidney passed away, Garnette later married Russell Doty. At the age of 92 Garnette chronicled her early years as a missionary to Liberia in her book titled, Ma Petersen’s Liberia.

Garnette is survived by two daughters: Patricia (Keith) Hansen and Rebecca (Leonard) Haapanen, who is the children’s pastor at Duluth Gospel Tabernacle, a daughter-in-law Catherine (Sutera) Petersen, 11 grandchildren, and 13 great grandchildren. Family and friends will gather Thursday, April 18 from 10 a.m. until the 11 a.m. service at Duluth Gospel Tabernacle, 1515 W. Superior St.

In honor of Garnette’s work and love for her friends in Liberia, memorials to Duluth Gospel Tabernacle Medical Missions are appreciated.

The full obituary can be viewed at https://www.duluthnewstribune.com/…/4599723-garnette-linnie…

Fellowship Minister at ASU

Dr. Mona Davies, director of Community Outreach Ministry in Wildomar, California, along with her husband, Bob, will attend the four-day National Children of Incarcerated Parents Conference to be held in Phoenix April 14–17.

At the conference Davies will share her approach to helping families of incarcerated parents—the results of her research and ten years of ministry experience called “Breaking the Cycle of Incarceration.”  

In addition to writing a book on the subject, Davies has conducted a number of workshops and seminars in Riverside County (California) communities, schools, and churches. Now, she brings her findings to a national audience at this conference, hosted by Arizona State University’s Center for Child Well-Being.

Dr. Mona and Bob Davies are co-founders of Community Outreach Ministry, established in 2000. The ministry serves advocates for at-risk and needy children, especially those of incarcerated parents. They use outreaches, camping experiences, mentor protégé and workshops, among other activities to provide social, spiritual, educational, and vocational opportunities to children who have been affected by parental incarceration.

More information on the Davies’s organization can be found here.

8 Ways To Encourage the Flow of the Holy Spirit

J. Lee Grady was editor of Charisma for 11 years before he launched into full-time ministry in 2010. Today he directs The Mordecai Project, a Christian charitable organization that is taking the healing of Jesus to women and girls who suffer abuse and cultural oppression. Author of several books including 10 Lies the Church Tells Women, Grady has just released his newest book, Set My Heart on Fire, from Charisma House.

In this article from Charisma magazine Grady offers advice on how to push back against trends in a culture that has pushed the Holy Spirit to the edges. After you’ve read it, feel free to offer your comments below.
          Eight Ways to Encourage the Flow of the Holy Spirit

Water in His Name

Steven Mayanja, Foreign Mission Director of the World Outreach Ministry Foundation, reports on multiple projects currently underway in seven East African countries.

This photo essay gives a glimpse of just one project in Burundi, providing clean water for remote villages. In some cases before WOMF provided wells, people—even young children—were required to walk distances of several miles to fill canisters with water.

The efforts of WOMF not only bring the community together in a cooperative project to improve conditions in the village, they also provide a tangible expression of the love of God reaching to a people in need. The water projects (and other WOMF projects) are part of their overall mission to bring Jesus to meet the deeper, spiritual needs of people.

Mixing concrete for mortar to support the sides of the well being dug.

 

Woman carrying rocks for the walls of the well—just some of the many members of the community who get involved with the water project.

 

Organizing the volunteers is key to helping community members who are working to improve the conditions of their own village.

 

Shoring up the sides of the well with rocks from the area so people may safely access the water.

 

Clean water is finally piped to the community. Jesus said, “Truly I tell you, anyone who gives you a cup of water in my name because you belong to the Messiah will certainly not lose their reward.” (Mark 9:41)

 

A New Class of Ministers

Long-time missionary, Nathan Rasmussen, recently spoke in Uvira, Congo, just over the border from Bujumbura, Burundi, at the graduation ceremony for one of their 20 diploma-level Bible schools in East Africa. Pictured here are just 30 of the graduates. Nearly 25 percent of the graduates were sick and unable to attend, with three students dying of their illnesses before graduation.

“Life in Eastern Congo is rough,” says Rasmussen. “People live day to day with war, sickness—and now Ebola.” The Congo, however, now has a new president and people are hopeful that things will improve. Noting that physical conditions have changed little since he first visited the Congo 36 years ago, Rasmussen also pointed out that the Gospel has continued to spread and churches have continued to grow despite all the turmoil.

Rasmussen reports that the work of training East African ministers has expanded, especially in the area of missions mobilization and training—as has the need for additional resources and finances. “Somehow we need to increase the net as the work continues to grow,” he said.

On his way to visit Uvira, Rasmussen conducted a 2-day seminar for 13 prospective missions school students from Burundi. So far he has seen 97 graduate from their missionary training schools, 28 of whom are now working among unreached people groups and 4 others working in the African churches, stirring them to do their part in answering the Great Commission.