Church on the Front Lines

Helping people in need is a passion for Greg McMullen and The Well Church, which he pastors in Lake Stevens, Washington. When he and his wife, Amy, began their ministry, they put a blessing box in front of their house. Each day they would put over $200 worth of canned food in it, as well as food donations from others.

McMullen and his church began to provide food three times a week for any who came. They also made 200 to 300 sandwiches to distribute to the area’s homeless. They ran into a few logistical and bureaucratic snags, however.

“We had a bumpy start,” says McMullen, referring to some early opposition that sidelined a few of their efforts. They were even questioned about delivering groceries to the elderly and others in need.

Then, over a year ago, the blessing box was destroyed when it was hit by a car. McMullen felt that they should wait for the right time to rebuild it.

He could not then have imagined what would happen, because all of that was before COVID-19 came along. A few weeks ago an area gleaning (or benevolence) ministry asked for some assistance, and the McMullens started bringing in food to help during the quarantine.

Food ministry to many in and around Lake Stevens, Washington, who have lost their income during the COVID-19 crisis.

“Some friends of ours heard about our earlier problems,” says McMullen. They informed a large food bank, which responded by dropping off two big truck loads providing food for more than 1,000.

A number of people lobbied for the food ministry of The Well Church—including the county representative, himself a former pastor, mayors from two neighboring cities, and the county Sheriff’s department.

Recently a mother came to get food for her family, asking how much she could take. “Take what you need,” McMullen told her. She fell on her knees, crying and thanking God.

“The Lord broke my heart with his mercy,” says McMullen.  The family with four children had been eating only what the school gave for the kids’ lunches. “I began to weep as I felt the Father’s heart for his people,” he says.

Now the county helps with traffic, staging vehicles for parking, a critical issue for a small church with limited space. “Now we see people coming from 30 or 40 miles to fill up two shopping carts of food,” says McMullen. “It is truly amazing to see.”

Over 2,500 people have been coming to the church each week for food. McMullen drives a rental truck 120 miles round trip, aiming for three trips each day they distribute food. Over 350,000 pounds of food were delivered last week.

Why rent a truck at nearly $1,000 a week? “Unfortunately,” McMullen explains, “I destroyed the engine in my pick-up in the process of pulling a trailer with food.” Although a local dealer provided them with an excellent deal on a new pick-up, they are trusting God for a larger box truck to haul the amount of food needed for the ministry.

Officials estimate 18 months are needed for area families to recovery from quarantine restrictions, so McMullen has made a two-year commitment to bring food, which is shared with two other churches and three gleaning ministries.

“Many people have come to Christ,” says McMullen about the spiritual impact of their work. “We have been baptizing people during this time.” It’s typical to see them praying for people in the parking lots. They have given away over 1,000 Gideon Bibles—their entire inventory.

McMullen says, “It is almost like the book of Acts. God has really moved here.”

He still thinks of the desperate mother, thanking God for his blessings. “I have not been able to stop crying,” he says. “All I think about is how we can bring more food in to help the people.”

Amy and Greg McMullen.

As their ministry has grown and McMullen’s “tent-making” role as a contractor has been put on the back burner, he is praying for financial partners to help purchase a used box truck for $34,000 or to provide ministry support for the next 18 months.

More information about the ministry can be found at the church’s website, Facebook page, or their GoFundMe page.

Hope Until the End of the Age

by Thomas Yerman

Hope seems to be in short supply these days. Media reports are often bleak and pessimistic, despite occasional attempts to end with a “feel good” story.

This year’s lead up to Easter has been unlike any in recent memory. But what an opportunity for us to offer the world some life-giving hope!

Hope means to expect—even anticipate—certain things to happen. Hope helps us avoid worry or, at the least, manage it. Without hope, worry can distort the way we see things, the way we feel. Worry can rule over us, dictating what we do. Worry can manipulate our feelings, feeding fear and even despair.

Worry strangles the strength of hope. Seven hundred years ago, the Old English word, wyrgan, which evolved to become our word, “worry,” literally meant “to slay, kill or injure by biting and shaking the throat”—as in an antiquated phrase about a dog “worrying” an old shoe.
That’s what worry does to hope!

Spring and nature remind us that hope can be a common experience, essential to life. This “common hope,” however, is more of a wishful expectation that something you want will come. There are benefits in having that kind of hope, but there are no guarantees. In fact, common hope could set you up for disappointment when your expectations fail to materialize.
Essential hope” on the other hand, is quite different from common hope. Essential hope is, well, absolutely essential to life.

Where do we find that essential hope? How can we offer essential hope to the world? That kind of hope is based on God’s presence and promise, found specifically in Jesus Christ and salvation that comes through him. That’s why I like to define HOPE as: Heavenly Optimism Promoting Eternal-life.

Essential hope is an expression of a confident expectation we find in a three-way relationship between the Creator, his Creation (us), and his Word. Connect these three properly, and our feelings and desires will align with God’s. It’s a hope that points to our future life in eternity: “…we wait eagerly for our adoption to sonship, the redemption of our bodies. For in this hope we were saved…” (Rom. 8:23-24)

In this season especially we remember the source of our hope. Through Lent, Palm Sunday, Good Friday, and Easter celebrations, believers are revived in the hope God has given through the resurrection of his Son, Jesus Christ.

If we are truly building our lives on the redemptive work of Christ, we should all be optimists, filled with hope. We know whatever happens to us here on earth is temporary. Jesus promised us that after life with all its hardships has ended, we will be in a place where pain, suffering, and death are no more. Jesus came to earth to take our sufferings upon himself so we could one day be free from every form of suffering forever.

The reality of Christ’s atoning sacrifice and his promises throw open the gates of heaven that give us the optimism we need for promoting eternal life in and through our lives today.

When we stray from living out our redemption as God intended, we can lose our hope. When people feel no hope, they begin to fear. According to Cliff Wilt, FEAR is “Forgetting Everything About Redemption.

Hope is dependent upon our redemption—having our sins forgiven. Because without redemption a person has good reason to fear.

So hold on to your faith and your hope in Christ! It gives us the strength to make earthly suffering bearable. It gives us the confidence to trust in God’s sovereign plan, looking forward to the day of Christ’s return when our bodies will be resurrected and all creation will be redeemed.

It’s good to cut pollution and clean up our planet, but it’s even better to remove sin and redeem our lives. Jesus has the authority and power to restore all things, perfectly. Both “a new heaven and a new earth” will come in God’s timing.

In the end of the age, the earth will be a place where God makes his dwelling among his people as he originally intended in the garden of Eden. Everything happening between now and then is moving us toward that glorious time.

God is fulfilling his sovereign plan! We trust in him as we anticipate heaven and Christ’s bodily return. Hope might not remove today’s suffering, but it can help us put pain in perspective. The time is coming when we will participate in the glory of Christ, but for now we are being prepared for eternal life. We have a purpose to accomplish while we are here and a hope to sustain us until we get there.

Our hope enables us to rejoice and celebrate even in the midst of suffering.

Set your hearts on things above, where Christ is seated at the right hand of God.
Set your minds on things above, not on earthly things”
(Col. 3:1-2).

Jesus gives us the hope we need so we know something good is going to happen.

Let Heavens Optimism Promote Eternal-life in and through you today! God is building his Church, and he still has his arms wrapped around the world. Believers in Christ have an essential hope and calling. Jesus promised to be with us always, to the very end of the age when the permanent will overtake the temporary. Heaven is coming, can you feel it?

“And you also were included in Christ when you heard the message of truth, the gospel of your salvation. When you believed, you were marked in him with the seal, the promised Holy Spirit, who is a deposit guaranteeing our inheritance until the redemption of those who are God’s possession to the praise of his glory.” (Ephesians 1:13-14)


Thomas Yerman is an FCA pastor ministering at Living Hope Church in Elk Grove Village.

One Nation Under God

by Thomas Yerman

Our Declaration of Independence for the United States along with our Pledge of Allegiance certainly make the case that this nation was and is influenced by Christianity. Our history and documents provide strong evidence that testifies to our being a nation that holds to the truth of worshiping God, the Creator—in whose image people are made, by whose authority we have a system of government, and under whose power we live.

We live in a nation and world that is constantly changing. And because we believers are those who truly trust in God, and therefore his Word, whenever these changes come to challenge our lives and ministries, we take a stand in faith. Our faith is not merely an intellectual belief but a down-to-the-core heart belief that is acted upon no matter what changes might come. Faith changes lives. Our faith not only impacts our lives, but the lives of those around us.

I understand that it is only human to be anxious about what might lie ahead, particularly in uncertain times. Growing anxious is a human trait—what I call our “default mode.” It’s been around for a long time. Paul, an apostle of Jesus Christ, while being held as a prisoner “in chains,” gave the people of Philippi a message they needed to hear in their sufferings. They lived in an age of frequent disease, war, and famine—times that caused their future to look questionable and uncertain.

Paul wanted them to take their eyes off their troubles, which were like an immovable mountain, and look instead to the One who could move it. They were more focused on their troubles than on their God who could help them. He wanted them to know that their lives were in the hands of a loving God who would give them peace. He didn’t tell them that all the bad stuff would go away, but instead gave them direction with a promise:

“Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.”(Philippians 4:6-7)

Paul promised believers in Jesus Christ that God would calm their fear and comfort their spirits. He encouraged them to put their worries in the hands of Someone bigger than themselves and more powerful than the troubles they were facing. It was a reminder to trust God.

We are also living in a challenging time, one that is calling believers to trust in God and shine in an hour of darkness and doubt.

We are being moved out of our comfort zone, called to put our faith over fear—in a God we can trust: The God who is the Everlasting-God, the Great-God, the Living-God, the Merciful-God, the Faithful-God, and the Mighty-God. The God who loves you! Our Refuge, Fortress, and Shield. He renews the strength of those who trust in him. So in anxious times, we should be able to display such a peace that those around us will bathe in the overflow. Faith not only changes a life; it changes the way a person looks at life.

Holding to the right perspective equips us with the divine power that will enable us to persevere the storm or “war” (as the battle with COVID-19 is being called). The Body of Christ must have no doubt that God is in control and that he cares and comforts those whose hearts are open to receive him. Only then will we be able to effectively reach out to the world. This is a time for the Church to be seen at its best. There is power in the name of Jesus!

“For he says, ‘In the time of my favor I heard you, and in the day of salvation I helped you.’ I tell you now is the time of God’s favor, now is the day of salvation.” (2 Corinthians 6:2)

Our attitude must be one of acting wisely and responsibly in what we do and in confidence leave the rest with God.

As individuals, now is the time to live out our faith and find out what we are made of. Our U.S. currency states, “In God We Trust.”  Now is the time to show that we actually do. As a nation, this is a time providing an opportunity to turn back to God and be united. We give our pledge as “One Nation Under God.” Are we?

Now is the time to show that trust even as we advance this “unity under God”! We are equipped to see this world (beyond what we perceive with our physical eyes and senses) through the Holy Spirit and knowledge of God’s Word. We can see into a “spiritual realm.”  Because we know God is in control of all creation and active in this world, we must also be aware that God is saying something in what he is allowing to impact our nation and the world by this coronavirus pandemic.

I believe God is allowing things to be shaken up to get the attention of the world—including his Church. In the distress of the day God is calling all of us back to himself. He is calling us to look to him with submitted hearts that will restore a relationship with him, the way he wants it.

It starts with his Church and particularly from the pulpit. As God’s spokesman and Priests of God to the people, we must speak and teach God’s Word plainly and clearly. We should hold back from saying what we think or what feels good to the people. It’s time to avoid the popular, not wanting to offend people. We should not fear or mistake people being offended by God’s Word with the Holy Spirit bringing conviction. It’s what should and must happen.

As we are learning to see things as God sees them, we must also speak things in line with what God feels—on every topic. Everything that God says is right and good.

Yes, there is a battle going on, and it’s spiritual. As a nation, we’ve strayed too far from God. People need to be led back to where they belong, where God wants them. We have what it takes. Now is the time for individuals and a nation to put its faith over its fear. And it starts with us.

Thomas Yerman is an FCA pastor ministering at Living Hope Church in Elk Grove Village.

I Thought It’d Be Persecution!

By John Sprecher (March 23, 2020)

Who could have imagined as we entered a new decade that by March nearly every church in America and in many parts of the world would be forced to close, left to try to figure out a way to function without having normal public meetings? 

During the past six weeks I have been privileged to preach in Liberia and three U.S. states, never imagining that when I returned home I wouldn’t be able to attend my home church. Instead I’m on a “shelter-in-place” order.

When I was in Bible School some 50 years ago during the turbulent days of Vietnam protests, the Jesus People Movement, and the Charismatic Renewal, I had a sense that the church needed to be prepared for a day when public meetings would not be allowed. I anticipated something like the underground church in China and other places that were (and are) facing persecution, forced to meet in secret. 

While the current pandemic has not been specifically aimed at the church, the effect has been a forced shift in how we do ministry. So we’ve had to adapt in whatever way we can, and most have been using the Internet. 

Technology is the good — and the bad news — of the day. We can LiveStream, hold virtual meetings, connect on Social Media or by other electronic means. In the short term, this is a wonderful blessing for these times. The challenge is that everything being transmitted is recorded on some digital file somewhere, and, as we have seen in many countries, the connections we enjoy can be removed quickly should someone in power decree it to be done.

I really liked what Pastor Danny Dodge from Solutions Church wrote in his announcement to his congregation:

“Notice that we didn’t say we are ‘canceling church’ or ‘canceling services.’ That may seem subtle, but we believe this is very important. The only way to ‘cancel’ the church would be for us all to renounce Christ and stop following Him, because the church is not a place or a service. The church is people who believe in Jesus and live and love like He does. And right now, our world needs what Jesus brings more than ever.

So let’s all gather online this weekend for services — we’ll see you there!”

So what are we to do? First and foremost, as pastors we need to help our congregants be “Jesus dependent” and not “crowd dependent.” Our churches, in reality, are only as strong as the individuals in it and are not dependent on the size of the crowd. 

David, in the Old Testament, learned there were times when every support system could fail and all that was left was his ability “to encourage himself in the Lord’’ (1 Samuel 30:6). Let’s help our people learn to stand strong like David, Daniel, and so many others. We can continue to cherish the God-enabled synergy developed when two or three are gathered in the name of Jesus and are strengthened by the fellowship that results. And when circumstances prevent us from being together physically, we can always count on God being with us.

There are other things we can do, as well. At the very least, we can use these strange times and uncertain days to ensure that our communications systems are in place. We need in place a way to assure the physical and spiritual health and safety of everyone who is part of our flock. These may be challenging times, but challenging times have always led to seasons of growth and creativity for those who, having learned new dependence and wisdom from the Lord, embrace  the future with hope and confidence.

 John D. Sprecher is Lead Elder for the U.S. FCA and has previously pastor churches for 45 years, most of them at Rock Church in Rockford, Illinois.

NW FCA — and Coronavirus

by Dan Eide

The coronavirus pandemic has very much affected the Northwest part of the U.S. as well as the FCA churches there. At this point in time:

  • Per the governor of Washington State, all churches with 250 and greater must suspend services, or ensure no greater than 250 gather at any one time.
  • Many churches, including less than 250 people are suspending services and live streaming their services.
  • Microsoft, Boeing and Amazon have had their employees telecommute as much as they are able. Businesses, especially Chinese-owned businesses, are being financially impacted due to fear of the virus.
  • Washington State announced on March 12  that all public and private schools in three counties (King — including Seattle, Snohomish, and Pierce) must suspend classes until April 27th. (Most of the FCA churches in the Northwest are within these 3 counties.) With the closing of public and private schools, it is unclear how this will impact youth and children programs in churches. It appears, however, this will have severe impact on education process for students, especially for families with special-needs children who typically would be in school will now have to figure out how their family life will need to adjust.
  • The I-5 freeway corridor running through King, Snohomish, and Pierce County — usually some of the busiest in the nation — is strangely no longer congested.
  • Hospitals have tents set up outside entrances to exam people before being cleared to enter buildings — or turned away.
  • All venues for large groups, such as sporting and entertainment events, have been told to cancel.
  • So far 31 people have died in Washington State because of COVID-19.

Our churches in this 3-county region will be impacted in numerous ways, including how they receive regular tithes and offerings. Many congregations already have systems for online giving in place. Those who do not yet have online giving as an option will face real challenges, especially considering the fact that ministry and missions work are not suspended during this time. Other normal church expenses, such as rent, mortgage, and utilities also remain in place.

Many churches are responding with more strategic communiques to their people during this time. Emailing members about church news, events, and ways to donate are helping during this unusual time.

This pandemic is especially beginning to take a toll on those with preexisting mental health issues. Many find the meeting place of church to be a place of great comfort to be loved on by the Body of Christ. Ministry to them will continue, but things will be different, and the coming weeks will reveal increased stress on everyone in our region.

In light of all that is happening around our state and nation, the believers here in Washington seem strong. However, churches that were previously under stress are especially vulnerable during this uncertain time. The Church in Washington State, along with their Shepherds and the individual members, all covet the prayers of saints around the nation.

And pray in the Spirit on all occasions with all kinds of prayers and requests. With this in mind,
be alert and always keep on praying for all the Lord’s people
(Eph. 6:18).

Dan Eide is pastor of Sisco Heights Community Church in Arlington, Washington.

Other resources:
Dealing with a Virus by John Sprecher, US FCA Lead Elder. Click HERE.
Why Watching TV News Is Bad for Your Health by Richard Doebler, FCA Media Editor. Click HERE.